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The Feast of the Einherjar, Connected To Esoteric Hinduism? 
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Joined: Mon Mar 05, 2012 4:07 pm
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As most know, the Edda is vast storehouse of esoteric knowledge preserved in metaphor. Very often I find that these metaphors can bee deciphered by comparing other religions which share the same common 'root Aryan-paganism', such as Hellenism, Hinduism and Buddhism, and Zoroastrianism (also, much of our original mysticism would seem to have been preserved in Catholicism via sycretization in certain myths, for instance the idea of a Pagan Graal is preposterous until one examines The Odrorir)

I would like to hear your opinions on the 'magickal trinity' of And-hrím-nir, Eld-hrím-nir, and Sæ-hrím-nir, in connection with the tantric bija 'Hrím'.
It is aid that the Einherjar (as I believe, the ascended souls of those who have lived honorably, or to the best of their ability; warriors OF life, yet not necessarily warriors IN live) feast on Sæhrímnir, while Wotan is sustained only by 'drink', or rather Odrorir.

here is a concise explaination of the bija i've found, for those not familiar with Hindu Tantra:
"The Tantric mantra Hreem (Hrim) is one of the most important of all mantras. It is the equivalent of OM (AUM) for the Goddess. It refers to the cosmic heart and can be used for all names and forms of the Goddess. Hreem is Pure Undifferentiated Consciousness and the Creative Power of the Infinite Creation.
The blessings of HREEM (hrim) is like the spiritual nature of the Sun, particularly in terms of illumination. It increases our aspiration and receptivity to Divine light, wisdom and truth. Its pure vibration also has the ability to heal us."


Mon Sep 25, 2017 5:07 pm
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Joined: Fri Nov 07, 2014 6:39 pm
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Tyrsson, we have not heard from you in a while, it is good to have you back.

This is an interesting concept. I am studying meditation teachers training and in this we study the concept of the trinity as you describe it. This raised questions and I have also been researching the 'trinity' parallels.

http://www.speakingtree.in/blog/trinity-in-world-religions

https://www.ucg.org/bible-study-tools/booklets/is-god-a-trinity/how-ancient-trinitarian-gods-influenced-adoption-of-the

Stormr


Mon Sep 25, 2017 10:41 pm
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Joined: Thu Jul 28, 2016 6:35 am
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Welcome back, Tyrsson! I must admit, I don't know much on this topic, but would like to read up on it. Sounds interesting. I'm familiar with the chanting of Om, but had not heard of Hrim. I wonder how it is supposed to sound. I will look up the terms you mentioned and see what I can find.


Tue Sep 26, 2017 9:21 am
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Sæhrímnir: here is what I can add to this discussion. Sæhrímnir, "Sea-Rime", is the boar of Valhöll, said to be slain and reborn each day.
In Gaelic lore, the Manx god Manannan has a boar whom he slaughters for the feast each night and is alive again the next day. In his realm, there is also a fruit tree and a story that is remarkably similar to the tale of the Apples of Idunn. For what it's worth.
Andhrímnir: "Spirit-Rime", the cook of Valhöll.
Eldhrímnir: "Fire-Rime", the kettle in which Andhrímnir cooks the boar Sæhrímnir for the Einherjar.

So what I get out of this, without reading the lore that accompanies these terms, is we have three elements: spirit (air?), fire, sea (water). My copy of the Edda has the terms listed in the glossary, but does not say where to find them in the book, so it's going to take a lot of reading to find the context.


Tue Sep 26, 2017 9:38 am
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Also may be of interest: Norse "Hrímr" translates to "frost", "time". Also, a Jötun.
Wasn't it the rime which Audhumla licked, and which nourished life?


Tue Sep 26, 2017 9:41 am
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Joined: Mon Mar 05, 2012 4:07 pm
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Thanks for you input! I found this most helpful: http://www.germanicmythology.com/ugm2/ugm2no1-6.pdf

It seem we’re much closer now…

From Hvergelmir in Nifelheim
Flows the Elivagar
Into the Gap-of-Ginn

The void is gone
As never it were
Now Saer and Thoka remain

Far have flowed the Elivagar
And cold have they grown
Once frozen, form Kvikudropar
Once hardened, Hrim

More and yet more did this occur
Until Audhumla arose from the churning
And Ymir filled the yearning
And Buri came to be


Nifelheim = primordial ice
Muspelheim – primordial fire
Elivagar = pulsing emantaions
Hvergelmir = the cosmic geyser
Ginn = primal essence of matter / existance
Saer = ‘Sea’ primordial ocean, were Jormundgand will be thrown into
Thoka = Mist, fog, atmosphere
Kvikudropar = seeds of life
Hrim (‘hreem’) = life-force, primal chaos
Audhumbla = the universal ‘lactation’, original maternal force
Ymir = progenitor of the jotun, or hrímþursar, beings springing from primal chaos

It would seem that ‘Ginn’ is replaced by, or transmuted into, Saer via the eleven-fold action of the cosmic ‘churning well-spring’, which itself is born from the ‘warm winds’ of Primordial-Fire interacting with Primordial-Ice. Afterward, the seeds of life are formed when the pulsing emanations of the cosmic geyser cool (or rather, ‘slow down’). When they all fully frozen (or rather, ‘totally without motion’), they become cosmic life-force (‘hrim’) which also acts as a (somewhat refined enough for creation) chaos.

‘Hrim’ is can also be found in these names: hrimthurs / hrimthursar, Hrimnir, and Andhrimir, Eldeldhrimir, and Saehrimir. Perhaps this will give a clue as to their nature


Tue Sep 26, 2017 6:29 pm
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Joined: Thu Nov 12, 2015 11:42 pm
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I believe this is very likely. I have not researched this particular topic; however, I have found a lot of similarities between old norse religious practices and old Hindu practices and beliefs. I’ve come to the conclusion that each had a common root religion and each has evolved over the centuries to become more and more different. However, the old practices and beliefs still share their common ancestors. I made a post a while back discussing how old hinduism also has a Valhalla for fallen warriors.


Mon Nov 13, 2017 1:47 pm
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