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Freemasonry & Odin Brotherhood 
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Joined: Sat Dec 12, 2009 9:42 pm
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This is directed to any of the Odin Brotherhood members who may know the answer. If a person becomes an initiated Freemason would that prevent them from later becoming initiated into the Odin Brotherhood?


Wed Dec 20, 2017 8:41 pm
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I apologize, I did a search and answered my own question.


Wed Dec 20, 2017 9:56 pm
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BjornBerserk wrote:
I apologize, I did a search and answered my own question.


I'm lazy and didn't. What is the answer? I'm guessing. "no."


Thu Dec 21, 2017 12:08 am
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I didn't research it either but this guy one time told me that to be a mason you had to believe in a "higher power"; wouldn't the Alfather qualify as that?


Thu Dec 21, 2017 12:39 am
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According to the mods in a previous thread, there a more than a few Brotherhood members who are Freemasons.


Thu Dec 21, 2017 2:05 am
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Also to those who are preparing for the rite of Bragi on the eve of the night of generosity my hopes are you attain the glimpse of extraordinary if you are can.


Thu Dec 21, 2017 2:07 am
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SonOfTheNorse wrote:
I didn't research it either but this guy one time told me that to be a mason you had to believe in a "higher power"; wouldn't the Alfather qualify as that?


I thought "higher power" was A.A. I've heard/read Masons using terms like "Supreme Being," which smacks a good deal more of the thinking of the Adamic religions like Judaism and Christianity. I think the formula is "a single god or divinity above all others." That is hardly an accurate characterization of Wotan. They also refer to a God who is "Grand Architect of the Universe." Again, this is a great deal more reminiscent of Genesis than the Eddas.

My question would be why one wanted to belong to both, aside from a fascination with secret societies. The Masonic ethos sounds like a blend of the Enlightenment seasoned with some post-modern jargon like "diversity" (on the California Freemasons site.)


Fri Dec 22, 2017 12:30 pm
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Wotan's Late Harvest wrote:
SonOfTheNorse wrote:
I didn't research it either but this guy one time told me that to be a mason you had to believe in a "higher power"; wouldn't the Alfather qualify as that?


I thought "higher power" was A.A. I've heard/read Masons using terms like "Supreme Being," which smacks a good deal more of the thinking of the Adamic religions like Judaism and Christianity. I think the formula is "a single god or divinity above all others." That is hardly an accurate characterization of Wotan. They also refer to a God who is "Grand Architect of the Universe." Again, this is a great deal more reminiscent of Genesis than the Eddas.

My question would be why one wanted to belong to both, aside from a fascination with secret societies. The Masonic ethos sounds like a blend of the Enlightenment seasoned with some post-modern jargon like "diversity" (on the California Freemasons site.)



From my discussions with Freemasons I gathered that Freemasonry is non-religious in the sense that a person of any creed can learn the lessons of Freemasonry but they are easier instilled in a person who at least believes in some sort of divinity. They use symbols, legends and stories in their mysteries to express deeper truths and using truths to build or "craft" better men and thus build a better world. Because of this each lodge seems to be a representation of the local people they recruit from...In the bible belt you will have lots of Christians , in some French lodges believing in a "higher power" is not a requirement. I think you get the point.
Like any mysteries they try and protect themselves from the unworthy but in the end what people do with the truths they discover is up to them.

Regardless my favorite mysteries has been for more than a decade and will continue to be the Odin Brotherhood and those of the Aesir and Vanir.


Fri Dec 22, 2017 3:34 pm
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BjornBerserk wrote:
Wotan's Late Harvest wrote:
SonOfTheNorse wrote:
I didn't research it either but this guy one time told me that to be a mason you had to believe in a "higher power"; wouldn't the Alfather qualify as that?


I thought "higher power" was A.A. I've heard/read Masons using terms like "Supreme Being," which smacks a good deal more of the thinking of the Adamic religions like Judaism and Christianity. I think the formula is "a single god or divinity above all others." That is hardly an accurate characterization of Wotan. They also refer to a God who is "Grand Architect of the Universe." Again, this is a great deal more reminiscent of Genesis than the Eddas.

My question would be why one wanted to belong to both, aside from a fascination with secret societies. The Masonic ethos sounds like a blend of the Enlightenment seasoned with some post-modern jargon like "diversity" (on the California Freemasons site.)



From my discussions with Freemasons I gathered that Freemasonry is non-religious in the sense that a person of any creed can learn the lessons of Freemasonry but they are easier instilled in a person who at least believes in some sort of divinity. They use symbols, legends and stories in their mysteries to express deeper truths and using truths to build or "craft" better men and thus build a better world. Because of this each lodge seems to be a representation of the local people they recruit from...In the bible belt you will have lots of Christians , in some French lodges believing in a "higher power" is not a requirement. I think you get the point.
Like any mysteries they try and protect themselves from the unworthy but in the end what people do with the truths they discover is up to them.

Regardless my favorite mysteries has been for more than a decade and will continue to be the Odin Brotherhood and those of the Aesir and Vanir.


I hold to a creed becuse it challenges me. Love of mystery has nothing to do with it. If obscurantism is the point of this group, then f*** this place. I am gone.


Sat Dec 23, 2017 5:27 am
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I thought "higher power" was A.A. I've heard/read Masons using terms like "Supreme Being," which smacks a good deal more of the thinking of the Adamic religions like Judaism and Christianity. I think the formula is "a single god or divinity above all others." That is hardly an accurate characterization of Wotan. They also refer to a God who is "Grand Architect of the Universe." Again, this is a great deal more reminiscent of Genesis than the Eddas.

My question would be why one wanted to belong to both, aside from a fascination with secret societies. The Masonic ethos sounds like a blend of the Enlightenment seasoned with some post-modern jargon like "diversity" (on the California Freemasons site.)[/quote]


From my discussions with Freemasons I gathered that Freemasonry is non-religious in the sense that a person of any creed can learn the lessons of Freemasonry but they are easier instilled in a person who at least believes in some sort of divinity. They use symbols, legends and stories in their mysteries to express deeper truths and using truths to build or "craft" better men and thus build a better world. Because of this each lodge seems to be a representation of the local people they recruit from...In the bible belt you will have lots of Christians , in some French lodges believing in a "higher power" is not a requirement. I think you get the point.
Like any mysteries they try and protect themselves from the unworthy but in the end what people do with the truths they discover is up to them.

Regardless my favorite mysteries has been for more than a decade and will continue to be the Odin Brotherhood and those of the Aesir and Vanir.[/quote]

I hold to a creed becuse it challenges me. Love of mystery has nothing to do with it. If obscurantism is the point of this group, then f*** this place. I am gone.[/quote]

First let me say I'm not a Odin Brotherhood member so don't take what I say as 100% true. I'm still learning and if I learn anything every from a Freemason its to better build myself to be a greater Odinist.

Religiously I am Asatrur and hold this creed as you, but I am also an Odinist because I perform the greatest form of flattery.

The point of mystery isn't obsurantism, but a nugget of wisdom I have learned from the Odin Brotherhood is that a secret put more value on the information that had to be sought. It is the magic of the hidden answer that gives Odin his wisdom and thus his power.


Think on this.

Odin is the great seeker forever searching wisdom.
Frigga knows all but she does not tell she is the great mystery.

When the two are wedded who is the offspring of their union, and what does he represent?


Sat Dec 23, 2017 8:31 pm
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Also to the moderators I hope I did not misrepresent the Brotherhood in any fashion, if I did so I would appreciate correction.


Sat Dec 23, 2017 8:32 pm
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Reading all your replies and everybody's input; I personally would not want to be a Mason. I will stick with Wotan and the other Gods!


Sat Dec 23, 2017 10:08 pm
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SonOfTheNorse wrote:
Reading all your replies and everybody's input; I personally would not want to be a Mason. I will stick with Wotan and the other Gods!


There is no picking, the Freemasons aren't "religious" they are fraternity that uses secrets and mystery with Christian symbology as a vehicle to convey wisdom.

I was reading some sagas on Sacred-Texts.com and I came across "The Secret Teachings of All Ages" and noticed there was a section about Religious Practices among the Norse and Celts. The writer, Manly P Hall I found was a Freemason through the book. In the book he compares the Eulsian "Mysteries" of Ancient Greece and Rome, the rites of the Druids and Gothi with the degrees within their own fraternity.

Regardless I'm not a Freemason so I can't speak for them but with all due respect to those posting here I am surprised of the opinions of people who obviously know very little on the subject.


Sun Dec 24, 2017 12:13 am
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The monotheists are monopolists. Polytheists are not. Feel free to explore many paths. Of course, continue to honor our gods and our lore.

If you are already a Mason, spread our lore from within.


Sun Dec 24, 2017 7:23 am
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BjornBerserk wrote:
SonOfTheNorse wrote:
Reading all your replies and everybody's input; I personally would not want to be a Mason. I will stick with Wotan and the other Gods!


There is no picking, the Freemasons aren't "religious" they are fraternity that uses secrets and mystery with Christian symbology as a vehicle to convey wisdom.

I was reading some sagas on Sacred-Texts.com and I came across "The Secret Teachings of All Ages" and noticed there was a section about Religious Practices among the Norse and Celts. The writer, Manly P Hall I found was a Freemason through the book. In the book he compares the Eulsian "Mysteries" of Ancient Greece and Rome, the rites of the Druids and Gothi with the degrees within their own fraternity.

Regardless I'm not a Freemason so I can't speak for them but with all due respect to those posting here I am surprised of the opinions of people who obviously know very little on the subject.


Any group that "uses religious symbolism" is going to find itself classified as religious, whatever its claimed motives. In the same fashion, if I wear a NSDAP armband, people are going to draw conclusions about my politics, regardless of what i "really believe."


Mon Dec 25, 2017 1:30 pm
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Wotan's Late Harvest wrote:
BjornBerserk wrote:
SonOfTheNorse wrote:
Reading all your replies and everybody's input; I personally would not want to be a Mason. I will stick with Wotan and the other Gods!


There is no picking, the Freemasons aren't "religious" they are fraternity that uses secrets and mystery with Christian symbology as a vehicle to convey wisdom.

I was reading some sagas on Sacred-Texts.com and I came across "The Secret Teachings of All Ages" and noticed there was a section about Religious Practices among the Norse and Celts. The writer, Manly P Hall I found was a Freemason through the book. In the book he compares the Eulsian "Mysteries" of Ancient Greece and Rome, the rites of the Druids and Gothi with the degrees within their own fraternity.

Regardless I'm not a Freemason so I can't speak for them but with all due respect to those posting here I am surprised of the opinions of people who obviously know very little on the subject.


Any group that "uses religious symbolism" is going to find itself classified as religious, whatever its claimed motives. In the same fashion, if I wear a NSDAP armband, people are going to draw conclusions about my politics, regardless of what i "really believe."



Does it really matter what a group is classified as? I would say what it provides to it's members and it's impact on the world is of much greater importance. We may believe something is true but that doesn't make it true. So I made my own investigations into Freemasonry first hand.

What intrigued me is thusly;
1.Freemasons constantly profess to be seeking "light" which is knowlege/wisdom
2. Their Alters face the east and their Worshipful Lodge Master sits in the East. Why? Because in primordial religions most often venerated the sun as a primary deity and because the sun rises from and east and provide "light" this is important.
3. Their Deacons whose roles in formality are to be messengers of the lodge master all carry staffs. Why is this important? It is because the Roman god Mercury (who is often time identified with Hermes who is often times identified with Odin) carries a staff.
4. Their symbols holds wisdoms which are intended to better you as a person. The 24 inch gauge (a tool of the apprentice in Freemasonry) which is symbolic of 24 hours in a day and the breaking up of which (time management) is the beginning of their wisdom. To anyone who knows the basics of character building building a routine and being conscientious about your activities and how your time is spent is the absolute foundation of building yourself into anything you want to transform yourself into.
How does this pertain to Odinism and the Odin Brotherhood? To be worthy of meeting Gods one must be worthy through their actions and what you do everyday counts? Perhaps an organization such as this may aid me in building myself into a better man worthy of one day speaking with the Gods in the flesh. Perhaps understanding of their mysteries will aid me in understanding my own?

Of course this is all in theory, reality always has it way of shattering our preconceived notions. I had recently met with a group of Freemasons for dinner and one thing I realized was a few of the Freemasons I think considered themselves "Good People" although they were obviously physically feeble and their notion of "good" revolved around being harmless. I asked one man if he would ever have children with his wife and he replied "Well it depends, I view everything in asset or expenditure and i'm not sure that children are an expenditure I willing to pay for." To the other extreme I met another man more like myself, more robust who was a former soldier like myself and I enjoyed his company and the wisdom he shared.

What is the point of this? I learned just through membership that obviously Freemasonry on it's own perhaps will not imbue one with wisdom and character. The former soldier perhaps would have been wise whether or not he was a Freemason. I have invited out to come out more and partake in taking a degree but I am unsure if I am willing to commit to the memorization of their lore, time being life's most precious asset and instead refocus on my journey to finding my path to the Odin Brotherhood. The things I have learned in the short time I have studied the Masons and been associating with them have definitely brought clarity to a few things in the OB lore I was perhaps confused or unsure of.


Thu Dec 28, 2017 1:34 am
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Hail BjornBerserk,

I have spent years flirting with the idea of joining my family and friends in the Lodge and it's good to know that I'm not the only one intrigued by the Masons. I have known Buddhists to be Masons (although they tend toward the Rotary), and I see no issue with a Masonic Odinist, but for me the compromise is in the amount of attention they give to symbolism related to Solomon's temple. I would much rather learn about the wolf over the western door of Valhalla and the heroes of my Lore than the [IDONTWANTMYTHROATSLIT] that you learn about in Masonic training. Still, as you no doubt know, we learn about ourselves as we learn about others. Their community is particularly strong and effective in cultivating strong leaders and one can imagine the benefits from an Odinist presence with Masonry. I wish you the best, whatever path you choose to follow.

r


Fri Dec 29, 2017 2:54 am
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RedSon wrote:
Hail BjornBerserk,

I have spent years flirting with the idea of joining my family and friends in the Lodge and it's good to know that I'm not the only one intrigued by the Masons. I have known Buddhists to be Masons (although they tend toward the Rotary), and I see no issue with a Masonic Odinist, but for me the compromise is in the amount of attention they give to symbolism related to Solomon's temple. I would much rather learn about the wolf over the western door of Valhalla and the heroes of my Lore than the [IDONTWANTMYTHROATSLIT] that you learn about in Masonic training. Still, as you no doubt know, we learn about ourselves as we learn about others. Their community is particularly strong and effective in cultivating strong leaders and one can imagine the benefits from an Odinist presence with Masonry. I wish you the best, whatever path you choose to follow.

r


Thank you for the understanding RedSon. Your response shows great wisdom and experience in the world.

I was recently invited and attended another Freemason dinner at the lodge and I was more impressed and found some very wise men there. I will admit it caused me to be a bit more conflicted then before.


Sat Jan 06, 2018 5:44 pm
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Personally, I see nothing wrong with joining an organization such as the Masons. My criteria are fairly simple:
- Are these people I want to associate with?
- Can I learn from them/will they help me improve?
- Do their beliefs and practices conflict with mine, and if so is it something that can be worked around?

For those of us who seek wisdom, it is folly to expect not to have to work for it. Wounded, Odin hung himself for nine days to gain wisdom. I do not think that he would frown upon one of us hanging out with a group that will help us grow. A Masonic Lodge also helps it's community, that is not something to be overlooked.


Sat Jan 06, 2018 9:25 pm
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