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Tyrian Spirituality 
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I came across this while studying the other day and thought it was worth sharing.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Gamlinginn, from Mountain Thunder, Issue 10, Autumn 1993. wrote:

Tyrian Spirituality

Spirituality can be defined as sensitivity or attachment to a particular set of religious values.

What this means, is a particular path to one or more Deities. A person's spirituality is that individual person's path to the Deity or Deities to whom she or he is drawn. A path, perhaps, composed of many parts - but all pointing in the same direction, down the same pathway toward Ásgardh.

There are many spiritualities within Ásatrú. Some are better suited for some individuals, and others are better suited for other individuals. It is important that each person find the spirituality that is best suited to them - and then try to follow it at all times. The idea is to bring Ásatrú fully into one's life. Otherwise, people are in danger of letting their religion become simply a series of social gatherings, toasting the Deities (and occasionally asking them for favors) but nothing more. And there is so much more.

At this time, the best known spirituality within Ásatrú is Ódhinnian Spirituality, the Spirituality of Ódhinn. (Do not confuse Ódhinnian with Ódhian or Ódhinnist, each of these three words has a completely different meaning.*) Also popular at the present are the various Vanic Spiritualities, centered around one or more of the Vanir. The Spirituality of Thórr (Thor) has some staunch followers, although for some reason not as many as one might expect.

Tyrian Spirituality is a spirituality within Ásatrú that emphasizes the virtues and characteristics associated with the god Tyr and the Goddess Zisa (who are counterparts of each other). In basic terms, Tyrian Spirituality involves always trying to do what is right, what is fair, what is just, and what is honest, with special stress on service to, and protection of the community, both the Ásatrú community and the general community in which one lives.

To understand Tyrian Spirituality, one must first have at least some understanding of the God Tyr.

Tyr is known as the one-handed God. In the Prose Edda ("Gylfaginning"), Snorri tells the story of how Tyr lost his right hand to the Fenris Wolf. This story is very symbolic of all that Tyr stands for: self-sacrifice in order to maintain the safety and stability of the community. Tyr is the God of justice and true law, the God of keeping one's word and upholding that which is right.

Some people have thought of Tyr as a God of War, a confusion that has existed as far back as the days of pre-Christian Rome. The Romans called the third day of the week the Day of Mars, and it is still called martes in Spanish. This was translated into Tyr's Day in northern Europe, Tuesday in modern English. However, it is not that simple. Those who call upon Tyr before going into combat do so because they want to draw attention to the rightfulness of their struggle, not simply for strength against their opponents.

Thórr helps those who call on him and are sincere. Ódhinn helps those who call on him if he wants to. Tyr helps those who call on him if, and only if, their cause is just.

Tyr is not as exciting as Ódhinn, but without Tyr everything would quickly fall apart. It is Tyr who holds it all together and keeps it all running smoothly.

Tyrian symbols are: Tiwaz the Tyr Rune, the Irminsul, the Hand of Tyr, the Bound Fenris Wolf, and the North (Pole) Star, the Constant Star.

It might be use ful at this point to say a few words about Zisa, the female counterpart of Tyr. (I do not like to use the term "wife" because the relationships of the Gods and (Goddesses to and with each other are very different from those of humans.) There is a reference to her, although not by name, in the Poetic Edda ("Lokasenna", verse 40). Jacob Grimm devotes several pages to Zisa in his work, Teutonic Mythology. Freya Aswynn also mentions Zisa in her book, Leaves of Yggdrasil. We know that Zisa exists because theologically all of the Deities have both a female and a male form. Unfortunately, very little about Zisa has come down to us from ancient times.

Tyrian Spirituality is often called a Code of Honorable Conduct. Tyr and Zisa can give one great strength, but it comes with two great responsibilities:

1. It must never be used for evil;
2. The strong must always protect the weak.

Those who follow the path of Tyrian Spirituality are called Tyrians. Before doing anything, Tyrians ask themselves what are called Tyr's Three Questions: "Is it moral?" "Is it legal?" "Is it beneficial to all concerned?" If the answer to any of these questions is "No" then they do not do it.

The Tyrian exists to serve, to help. The Tyrian asks no reward, expects no reward, and accepts no reward in return for service. The service itself is its own reward.

The Tyrian lives in Midhgardh and is very much a part of it, but learns not to worry about the trivia of Midhgardh. Tyrians often work to build things they know they will never live to see completed. But that does not matter to a Tyrian. If the work is good, it is worth doing. Tyrians say, "The glacier knows where it is going and when it will get there. It does not matter if others know or not."

Some who study comparative religion have remarked that are some similarities between Tyrian Spirituality and the Zen form of Buddhism, that Tyrian spirituality is "the Zen of Ásatrú," but there are also many differences.

Ásatrú is a polytheistic religion. There are many paths within Ásatrú. Each path has a purpose. All are needed, and all work together. Different people choose to follow different paths. Some pursue the path of Frigg and Ódhinn, seeking always to discover and change things. Others take the path of Thórr and Sif, defending all that they feel should be defended. Still others find the Vanir path, basking in the warm friendship of Freyja and Freyr.

The path of Tyr and Zisa is one of calm. It does not attract many. It brings no magical discoveries, no feelings of great strength and power, no material blessings. It brings only calm and the reward of service.


Wed Apr 01, 2015 9:52 pm
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I very much enjoyed this post. Where did you find this article so I can see it's other sources?


Sun Apr 05, 2015 6:35 pm
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Wow awesome.

I never knew this much about Tyr. I am
a student of Zen and following Tyr's 3
noble questions is something I have been
working on specifically for the past year..

I know Tyr sacrificed his hand to Fenrir
as a sacrifice, but knowing he is disabled
gives me strength as I too have a disability.

Thanks for this post Tyrsman, I feel like I
may have found a strojnger connection to Tyr
and will continue asking him for motivation to be
my strongest and best!

Hail to the Gods!

Bucky


Wed Apr 08, 2015 6:14 pm
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Haurus, I originally came across the article posted here: http://gamall-steinn.org/oldway.htm. They have several other articles that are also worth reading.

Bucky, I am glad that you find Tyr inspirational. Although he is not one of the more "popular" of the Aesir there are a few of us who follow his example and the principles he represents. On the surface information about Tyr may appear to be sparse but if you are willing to dig deep in your research you will be rewarded.

Another article that you might find interesting, and possibly a little unexpected, is this one: https://hailloki.wordpress.com/2013/03/16/the-tyrian-heathen/


Wed Apr 08, 2015 7:00 pm
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It was good, I liked it quite a bit. It introduces an organic concept that those who focus on a particular deity may posses different moral values than others. It might not seem like it, but such a tendency would have a tremendous impact on the shape and form of any State that grew from such roots. If you think about it, monotheism provides a uniform moral code which provides a firm foundation for a large, centralised state. Polytheism, with its different cults and deities, requires a very loose governance. Even the Romans had pretty simple and loose laws compared to the monotheistic States that later followed.

The first link led to a dead site, I don't think it is around anymore.


Wed Apr 08, 2015 7:51 pm
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Tyrsman wrote:
Haurus, I originally came across the article posted here: http://gamall-steinn.org/oldway.htm. They have several other articles that are also worth reading.

Bucky, I am glad that you find Tyr inspirational. Although he is not one of the more "popular" of the Aesir there are a few of us who follow his example and the principles he represents. On the surface information about Tyr may appear to be sparse but if you are willing to dig deep in your research you will be rewarded.

Another article that you might find interesting, and possibly a little unexpected, is this one: https://hailloki.wordpress.com/2013/03/16/the-tyrian-heathen/


Tyr is a god all should recognize and respect, because it's his teachings you will remember when you stand few against the many! Except for Odin, I hold Tyr in my highest regard.


Thu Apr 30, 2015 5:38 am
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Tyrsman, thank you for posting this. I have been busy of late and not had the time to read this till now. I have learnt much and my understanding of Tyr has deepened. I will seek further. Storm


Thu Apr 30, 2015 1:03 pm
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Tyrsman - on further exploration, I came across this paper you may find of interest with regard Tyr - I did. Storm

http://odinschildren.com/wp-content/upl ... -libre.pdf


Tue May 05, 2015 9:14 am
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Thanks NSD.


Tue May 05, 2015 11:57 am
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Yes, thank you very much for sharing this Storm, it is an excellent find.


Tue May 05, 2015 7:56 pm
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Tyrsman wrote:
Haurus, I originally came across the article posted here: http://gamall-steinn.org/oldway.htm. They have several other articles that are also worth reading.

Bucky, I am glad that you find Tyr inspirational. Although he is not one of the more "popular" of the Aesir there are a few of us who follow his example and the principles he represents. On the surface information about Tyr may appear to be sparse but if you are willing to dig deep in your research you will be rewarded.

Another article that you might find interesting, and possibly a little unexpected, is this one: https://hailloki.wordpress.com/2013/03/16/the-tyrian-heathen/



You honor me greatly, Tyrsman... I am the author of the latter blog, thank you for your kindness in sharing it in a positive light. Your post of the link lead me to this forum and it's a wonderful gift to be here so far.


Tue Jun 16, 2015 7:55 am
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Tyrsman wrote:
I came across this while studying the other day and thought it was worth sharing.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Gamlinginn, from Mountain Thunder, Issue 10, Autumn 1993. wrote:

Tyrian Spirituality

.....[cut for length]...

Some people have thought of Tyr as a God of War, a confusion that has existed as far back as the days of pre-Christian Rome. The Romans called the third day of the week the Day of Mars, and it is still called martes in Spanish. This was translated into Tyr's Day in northern Europe, Tuesday in modern English. However, it is not that simple. Those who call upon Tyr before going into combat do so because they want to draw attention to the rightfulness of their struggle, not simply for strength against their opponents.

Thórr helps those who call on him and are sincere. Ódhinn helps those who call on him if he wants to. Tyr helps those who call on him if, and only if, their cause is just.

Tyr is not as exciting as Ódhinn, but without Tyr everything would quickly fall apart. It is Tyr who holds it all together and keeps it all running smoothly.

Tyrian symbols are: Tiwaz the Tyr Rune, the Irminsul, the Hand of Tyr, the Bound Fenris Wolf, and the North (Pole) Star, the Constant Star.

It might be use ful at this point to say a few words about Zisa, the female counterpart of Tyr. (I do not like to use the term "wife" because the relationships of the Gods and (Goddesses to and with each other are very different from those of humans.) There is a reference to her, although not by name, in the Poetic Edda ("Lokasenna", verse 40). Jacob Grimm devotes several pages to Zisa in his work, Teutonic Mythology. Freya Aswynn also mentions Zisa in her book, Leaves of Yggdrasil. We know that Zisa exists because theologically all of the Deities have both a female and a male form. Unfortunately, very little about Zisa has come down to us from ancient times.

Tyrian Spirituality is often called a Code of Honorable Conduct. Tyr and Zisa can give one great strength, but it comes with two great responsibilities:

1. It must never be used for evil;
2. The strong must always protect the weak.

Those who follow the path of Tyrian Spirituality are called Tyrians. Before doing anything, Tyrians ask themselves what are called Tyr's Three Questions: "Is it moral?" "Is it legal?" "Is it beneficial to all concerned?" If the answer to any of these questions is "No" then they do not do it.

The Tyrian exists to serve, to help. The Tyrian asks no reward, expects no reward, and accepts no reward in return for service. The service itself is its own reward.

The Tyrian lives in Midhgardh and is very much a part of it, but learns not to worry about the trivia of Midhgardh. Tyrians often work to build things they know they will never live to see completed. But that does not matter to a Tyrian. If the work is good, it is worth doing. Tyrians say, "The glacier knows where it is going and when it will get there. It does not matter if others know or not."

Some who study comparative religion have remarked that are some similarities between Tyrian Spirituality and the Zen form of Buddhism, that Tyrian spirituality is "the Zen of Ásatrú," but there are also many differences.

Ásatrú is a polytheistic religion. There are many paths within Ásatrú. Each path has a purpose. All are needed, and all work together. Different people choose to follow different paths. Some pursue the path of Frigg and Ódhinn, seeking always to discover and change things. Others take the path of Thórr and Sif, defending all that they feel should be defended. Still others find the Vanir path, basking in the warm friendship of Freyja and Freyr.

The path of Tyr and Zisa is one of calm. It does not attract many. It brings no magical discoveries, no feelings of great strength and power, no material blessings. It brings only calm and the reward of service.


The only information I could add is that the existence of Tyr in human records predates that of Odin by around 6000 years in written word- where he was referred to as "Sky-God". Further, I feel Tyr in essence is the greatest God of Diplomacy- and one of the least followed since His ways are very morally strict.

In a UPG, I learned from Tyr that He would desire "People to not worship [Him] at all, rather than petition him for the wrong reasons or worship Him in incorrect context."

I have not met any True Tyrians in my area, it is refreshing to see many here active on this forum... I have been told by many people of many different Odinist paths that most who are called to Tyr decline and are unwilling to make the sacrifices of the self. We are poorer for that, but with time, hopefully ethics will return to the world and it will no longer be a "sacrifice" to be honest.

To the Urglaawe (Pa Deitsch), Zisa is said to be the "She Who Untangles Knots" both real and metaphorical. I hope this helps some.


Last edited by Tyrienne on Tue Jun 16, 2015 8:12 am, edited 1 time in total.



Tue Jun 16, 2015 8:04 am
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I just read your introduction and thought you sounded familiar. Although I am not nearly the wordsmith that you are, I find that I have a great deal in common with the way you think. I am truly happy that you have joined this forum.

As you can probably guess by my forum name I also a "follower" of Tyr. It is always good to be around other like-minded people.


Tue Jun 16, 2015 8:10 am
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Tyrsman wrote:
I just read your introduction and thought you sounded familiar. Although I am not nearly the wordsmith that you are, I find that I have a great deal in common with the way you think. I am truly happy that you have joined this forum.

As you can probably guess by my forum name I also a "follower" of Tyr. It is always good to be around other like-minded people.



And I am Extremely pleased to meet you as well- I kept re-editing that last post. What I really wanted to say is it was the latter part of the first post in this thread was the most accurate description of Tyrian's morality and life-path I have ever read.

Thank you for the compliment. I use many words because I find it hard to describe how I think- since in my mind emotion tends to dominate over vernacular. I had to learn how to find "colorful" words to describe my thoughts/emotions. :)


Tue Jun 16, 2015 8:14 am
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I completely agree with your UPG, I find Tyr to look more kindly on those who solve their own problems in a just manner. I have always found that the times in which I have been willing to sacrifice for the greater good, or are willing to work hard now to prepare for an uncertain future are the times he has been the most involved in my life.


Tue Jun 16, 2015 8:21 am
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bucky wrote:
Wow awesome.

I never knew this much about Tyr. I am
a student of Zen and following Tyr's 3
noble questions is something I have been
working on specifically for the past year..

I know Tyr sacrificed his hand to Fenrir
as a sacrifice, but knowing he is disabled
gives me strength as I too have a disability.

Thanks for this post Tyrsman, I feel like I
may have found a strojnger connection to Tyr
and will continue asking him for motivation to be
my strongest and best!

Hail to the Gods!

Bucky


I am also disabled- I just recently came to peace with the fact that if I were not disabled, I would not be able to dedicate so much of my personal time to researching and helping the greater community. Working in an office 40+ hours a week in an office contributing to some heartless corperation may be what is considered "ideal" in our current society.

However, I prefer to believe the "ideal" is someone who contributes a rich legacy dedicating themselves to the Gods and Volk and Midgard being better for our existence rather than poorer!


Tue Jun 16, 2015 8:23 am
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Tyrsman wrote:
I completely agree with your UPG, I find Tyr to look more kindly on those who solve their own problems in a just manner. I have always found that the times in which I have been willing to sacrifice for the greater good, or are willing to work hard now to prepare for an uncertain future are the times he has been the most involved in my life.


Do you find in some of your UPG's he tests/questions you strongly to make certain your intentions are correct? This has been recent for me. When I first became close with Him, it was different.

I was in training to be a diplomat and it ended in a horrific interrogation. Tyr was the one who comforted me when I had nightmares and gave me His cup to drink from so I could forget for a time. (Several times, to be fair)

War occurs when Diplomacy fails- Tyr is also the God of those wounded by conflicts, including psychological traumas of PTSD. Despite not serving in our military, I find that many of my friends are veterans, police, or EMT's.

Now that I cope better with my symptoms, it seems He is more "encouraging" of greater engagement to correct wrongs and restore focus where I can away from gossip and towards seeking knowledge instead. I know few people who can both read intently and speak at the same time. ;)

Seeing Tyr sometimes indicates I am expected to say something which will bring things to light people hide to the detriment of others.
Other times, it's to see if I'm "ready" for some new responsibility yet to come. Like a Grandfather or beloved Mentor, I am not ashamed to admit I seek His approval and blessing on all I do.... which seems to be unusual in Odinism; many people do not seem to care what the Gods wish of them, but rather- what the Gods can do for them.

This is something else all Tyrians need to strive to correct in the greater community- The Gods are what we aspire to, we should not be looking to humanity for morality; by simply looking around us we can see that humanity relying on itself creates a world of the spiritually bankrupt, suffering, and the obliviousness of those who participate in "Group-think".

I love how my UPG's with Tyr always send me to research new things...such as the large, extinct Eagle he has as a Fyllgia. (If I find the link again I will share it in the UPG section)


Tue Jun 16, 2015 8:30 am
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Tyrienne wrote:
Do you find in some of your UPG's he tests/questions you strongly to make certain your intentions are correct? This has been recent for me. When I first became close with Him, it was different.

I can't say that Tyr has ever come to me in person. There's always the possibility that he has and I wasn't aware of his actual identity, I have only "awakened" to the fact that I was a follower of the Elder Kin about 4 years ago. Up until that point my heart and mentality were Odinist I just hadn't realized it. Once I became aware, everything fell into place - events in my life that had always puzzled me now made sense, the sources of instincts and intuitions were now clear, and those times that I could just feel another preference when nobody else was around were now explained.

Tyrienne wrote:
I was in training to be a diplomat and it ended in a horrific interrogation. Tyr was the one who comforted me when I had nightmares and gave me His cup to drink from so I could forget for a time. (Several times, to be fair)

War occurs when Diplomacy fails- Tyr is also the God of those wounded by conflicts, including psychological traumas of PTSD. Despite not serving in our military, I find that many of my friends are veterans, police, or EMT's.

I had never thought of Him in this way. My UPG has been that he is the one who has protected me from these wounds. My childhood should have doomed me to a path of self-destruction and I'm could be the poster child for the group of friends you mention (I was a combat medic for 20 years and now work in the law enforcement community). By all rights I should be an emotional and psychological mess (actually I should be dead but that's another matter) but instead I lead a perfectly normal and well-adjusted life. My awakening revealed how Tyr's guiding hand, not always gentle but always protective, has guided me my entire life.

Tyrienne wrote:
Now that I cope better with my symptoms, it seems He is more "encouraging" of greater engagement to correct wrongs and restore focus where I can away from gossip and towards seeking knowledge instead. I know few people who can both read intently and speak at the same time. ;)

For me, now that I am aware, I feel the sense of obligation to "repay" Him and the others who looked after me when there was nobody else who would.

Tyrienne wrote:
Seeing Tyr sometimes indicates I am expected to say something which will bring things to light people hide to the detriment of others.
Other times, it's to see if I'm "ready" for some new responsibility yet to come. Like a Grandfather or beloved Mentor, I am not ashamed to admit I seek His approval and blessing on all I do.... which seems to be unusual in Odinism; many people do not seem to care what the Gods wish of them, but rather- what the Gods can do for them.

I hope one day to meet him face to face. I too strive for His approval. Since turning to this path I have never asked the gods or goddesses for anything for myself other than insight and understanding. I think that asking them for things is foolish, most of the time they want to see you work for the things you want and earn them yourself. If they do decide to give you something you may not always like the manner in which you receive it. Most of them have paid a heavy price for things they hold dear, they are unlikely to just give us anything worthwhile for nothing just because we ask for it.

Tyrienne wrote:
This is something else all Tyrians need to strive to correct in the greater community- The Gods are what we aspire to, we should not be looking to humanity for morality; by simply looking around us we can see that humanity relying on itself creates a world of the spiritually bankrupt, suffering, and the obliviousness of those who participate in "Group-think".

I am in COMPLETE agreement! Look to humanity for excuses, look to the Gods for examples.

Tyrienne wrote:
I love how my UPG's with Tyr always send me to research new things...such as the large, extinct Eagle he has as a Fyllgia. (If I find the link again I will share it in the UPG section)

Please do so, I am looking forward to finding out more about it but don't seem to have very much personal time lately - it's taken me nearly 3 days to get this composed...


Fri Jun 19, 2015 2:44 pm
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Tyrsman: Hey! Time is no object, I'm currently awaiting surgery anyway- 3 days is no issue! I think we are working on two sides of the same coin. Where He saved you, He is is repairing me. I have never seen him in anything more tangible than dreams/visions myself. If I met Him "in person" here on Midgard- My first reaction would likely be Fear, I could not see that as a "good omen" unless it is Him by my side as I die someday.

I was inspired today and wondered if you would be supportive of the creation of a new thread regarding "Sacrifices made in the name of Tyr".

For instance:

An entire kindred is now uncomfortable around me because one member confessed to Oathbreaking (cheating on their spouse with another kindred member). This person approached me for advice/judgement on the matter. I indicated the Oathbreaker had one week to disclose their harmful actions to the wronged spouse and, ideally, the kindred. This person did not, so I disclosed the information to the Goethe of the kindred indicating that HE was to bring it up directly with the parties involved.

Instead of addressing the Oathbreaker, he gossiped with the entire community first which shamed them all.

Now, none of them speak to me even though the ONLY things I did was give advice/help when asked, and followed through on my own promises I made which were agreed upon as just and fair at the time.

I did not harm their kindred, they harmed themselves...they don't seem to dislike me, they just seem to "fear" me? It seems like the stupidest social situation imaginable.

However, I did it for Tyr and as a Tyrian.

Or we can go "trendy" and call it "Just Tyrian Things" and even add a little heart? <3 ;)


Sun Jun 21, 2015 7:30 pm
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A new thread would on that topic would be great. If we went the trendy route we'd probably have to find cutesy images for our posts and this forum isn't all that image friendly.

Your experience with that kindred is a good example of one of my reasons for my being a solitary practitioner. In my opinion it's hard to find a group of people who are capable of setting aside human nature in instances like this. Of course they fear you. As a Tyrian you are acutely aware of the proper course, and as a Lokian you are also more likely to do something about it. I think that is the real reasons Lokians get the reception they do from so many groups - they have a tendency to drag into the light things that a lot of people would rather remain hidden.


Sun Jun 21, 2015 10:50 pm
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