View unanswered posts | View active topics It is currently Tue Oct 17, 2017 10:09 pm



Reply to topic  [ 8 posts ] 
Some speculations about meanings of Odin receiving the Runes 
Author Message

Joined: Wed May 21, 2014 4:10 am
Posts: 79
I am thinking about this... anyone else have any thoughts?

Odin sacrificed himself to himself- one of my interpretations of that is that he gave up the most sacred gift he had, his life, to the womb that gave him life, nature. While Odin was on the tree, the Runes were given to him.. by nature. Would it be accurate to say that the source of all wisdom, even the wisdom of Mimir, comes from nature?

I have also been thinking about the significance of Odin hanging upside down. It makes me think of the idea that to achieve wisdom, one must let go of what you think you know, let go of previous perceptions and be open to new ideas...like that Buddhist saying, " one cannot fill a cup that is already full" So is Odin letting go of all that he is, in his sacrifice and his hanging upside down so that he can see what is not normally visible to the world.. the Runes? But when he saw them, it was after he had been upside down, changed his regular orientation to the world 180 degrees, for nine days. And once he had the Runes, it could be said, and this is all speculation here, that he then held both views points, seeing from below when hanging and from above when standing.. and had attained another element of wisdom -and strategy- the ability to understand many viewpoints...


Tue Jun 24, 2014 3:19 am
Profile

Joined: Fri Aug 02, 2013 4:36 am
Posts: 143
Oh that's wonderful. I agree there is some interpretation of symbolism needed. Because the runes were inscribed on the point of his spear. But I read that the spear may also not be a literal spear? Gar the 33rd Rune ? I'll be back to edit again no doubt. :)


Wed Jul 02, 2014 11:32 pm
Profile
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Thu Aug 09, 2007 5:01 pm
Posts: 3415
Location: Vinland
Autumnapples, I am unaware that Odin was hanging "upside down" when he sought the runes. From where is that idea?

I see. Some New-Age types seem to be confusing Odin with the Tarot Card hanged man.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Hanged_Man_(Tarot_card)


Thu Jul 03, 2014 12:17 am
Profile
User avatar

Joined: Tue Oct 16, 2012 9:44 pm
Posts: 1530
OdinBrotherhood wrote:
Autumnapples, I am unaware that Odin was hanging "upside down" when he sought the runes. From where is that idea?

I see. Some New-Age types seem to be confusing Odin with the Tarot Card hanged man.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Hanged_Man_(Tarot_card)


Interesting.

I have seen illustrations depicting Odin hanging upside down but had never read of it so I just attributed it to artistic interpretation. I am not very knowledgeable about the Tarot but that the Hanged Man card represents sacrifice and a new perspective would seem to indicate a connection. I usually try to avoid new age topics because for me they tend to muddy the waters but this might warrant further investigation, and I suppose the cards have been in use long enough that there are probably some decent academic resources concerning their origins.

Thank you.


Thu Jul 03, 2014 3:15 pm
Profile

Joined: Wed May 21, 2014 4:10 am
Posts: 79
OdinBrotherhood wrote:
Autumnapples, I am unaware that Odin was hanging "upside down" when he sought the runes. From where is that idea?

I see. Some New-Age types seem to be confusing Odin with the Tarot Card hanged man.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Hanged_Man_(Tarot_card)


OB and Tyrsman, thank you for pointing that out.. Of course, you are right, the Havamal does not say that Odin hung upside down. But as far as I can tell, and I am still learning the lore, the Havamal does not mention any specific positions for Odin as he hung on the tree.

Personally, whenever I read the passage, "..down into the depths I looked... screaming, I fell back from that place." I saw Odin as hanging by his feet, both feet, not one foot as the hanged man is depicted in the Tarot. I do not see much of a connection between the two- the hanged man of the Tarot and Odin. Since most evidence seems to indicate that Tarot originated in Medieval Europe around the late 1300 to early 1400's, Norse writings and beliefs superseded the Tarot. It is very possible that Norse beliefs may have indirectly influenced the Tarot...

Because Odin looked "into the depths", and the word "depth" tends to mean " below, under, in the earth", I assumed that he was upside down, hanging by his feet, looking at the ground below his head. I also assumed that the depths were an opening in the earth around the roots of Yggdrasil... "the tree of which no man knows where its roots run", but again, these are all just my assumptions and not in any text that I have come across so far.

And "depths" could also have meant "depths" within the great tree; or "depths" could have been used to mean "far away"- another definition of "depth" is "length and breadth". So Odin could have seen the Runes far in the distance as well. That passage does seem, like other stories of power, to lend itself to different interpretations in the absence of more specific clarification. I think in those places where less rather than more is explained, there can be a purposeful mystery leading to specific wisdom for the seeker.

It seems like more of a sacrifice to hang upside down instead of right side up. He makes a sacrifice to gain wisdom and one definition of wisdom is a change in perception. I can imagine Odin purposely hanging himself upside down to radically change his perception of the world in order to sacrifice his old views so that he can be open to a new way to "seeing".. and in this different position, he was able to "see" the Runes... Now all that being written, he could very well have been hanging right side up, reached down and fell as well. But for the reasons I have listed above and just by instinct, in my mind, I picture Odin as hanging upside down, by both feet, in order to get the Runes... Do I have any ancient writings to back this up? Not at all, merely my interpretation but one that I was putting forth as fact; so I appreciate OB and Tyrsman pointing that out.


Last edited by autumnapples on Mon Jul 07, 2014 5:51 am, edited 2 times in total.



Sun Jul 06, 2014 10:20 pm
Profile

Joined: Wed May 21, 2014 4:10 am
Posts: 79
Vanir21 wrote:
Oh that's wonderful. I agree there is some interpretation of symbolism needed. Because the runes were inscribed on the point of his spear. But I read that the spear may also not be a literal spear? Gar the 33rd Rune ? I'll be back to edit again no doubt. :)


Thanks, Vanir21
I am curious to see what you come up with regarding the spear... do you use Anglo-Saxon Runes exclusively?


Sun Jul 06, 2014 10:29 pm
Profile

Joined: Fri Aug 02, 2013 4:36 am
Posts: 143
I am checking into everything I can with an open mind. Celtic has a slight variation. I think the spear is an emblem in every early culture with several interpretations. Freud of course would say it's a fallic symbol. But as an actual Spear, prehistorical weapon used to start and sometimes end a battle, or a magic or advanced weapon beyond our understanding and technology or as a person or descendents from people, a "hidden" people who are a secret weapon of Odin.
I think that to put Runes on the point of a spear,( which is a rune symbol it's self), and that he had pierced himself with it could be symbolic as well as hanging on a tree. Where I became most astounded was with the last rune, because it is the Rune most powerful of All. I understood it to be symbolic of Odin himself or Wyrd in Celtic backgrounds. The Begining and the End.
I'm actually travelling to an area of the country that has people with more background and hope to find some answers there.
So still reasearching and undoubtedly editing.


Sat Jul 12, 2014 12:51 am
Profile

Joined: Sun Sep 02, 2012 5:32 pm
Posts: 552
In Xian lore, Peter is said to have been crucified upside down.

Since the Xians already borrow parts of the story of Odin's experience by placing parts of it in the story of Jesus Christ's crucifixion, I wonder if the reason they chose to have Peter get crucified upside down might be because they had heard an ancient version of the story, where Odin was hanging upside down, and wanted to steal that part also?

It would be funny if their attempts to steal lead to an accidental preservation of Pagan knowledge.


Sun Sep 14, 2014 4:39 am
Profile
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Reply to topic   [ 8 posts ] 

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
cron
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group
Designed by ST Software for PTF.