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2 books that I wish for someone to give a quick review for.. 
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Joined: Fri Jan 29, 2010 1:46 am
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I have read both and find the Machiavelli work especially interesting.

Another necessary work is Sun Tzu, The Art of War.


Mon Dec 06, 2010 6:25 am
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I've read both The Prince and The Art Of War, but not On War by Clauswitz. Although, I'd like to read it eventually. I once had a discussion with a Political Science major about The Prince and she was laughing because there is an irony in that Machivelli wrote the book as a critique of all the worst things a leader shouldn't do. He didn't actually intend for the book to be used by tyrants for the purpose of being more efficient in their tyranny.


Mon Dec 06, 2010 8:42 am
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I once had a discussion with a Political Science major about The Prince and she was laughing because there is an irony in that Machivelli wrote the book as a critique of all the worst things a leader shouldn't do. He didn't actually intend for the book to be used by tyrants for the purpose of being more efficient in their tyranny.


Actually, the book is written for tyrants. It is not a critique of tyrants.

Machiavelli lived in a chaotic time in Italy, and he learned first-hand that chaos is worse than any tyranny. Under a tyrant, only the enemy of the tyrant is in danger, such as Jews and Communists under Hitler. In periods of anarchy, everyone may be killed in the lawlessness and chaos that prevails.

As any Iraqi can tell you, Sadam was a cruel depot, but he kept the streets safe and the lights on. He killed and tortured thousands, but ordinary people who kept quiet felt safe. Today, during the chaos of the occupation, which we euphemistically call liberation, anyone can be killed in terror blasts and anti-insurgency operations, and the electric power is intermittent. According to some estimates, 600,000 Iraqis have been killed since the invasion, a number far larger than the deaths for the USA in WWII, a country with ten times Iraq's population!


Tue Dec 07, 2010 1:08 am
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Chuck wrote:
I would like to know if anyone here has read either "The Prince" by Machiavelli, or "On War" by Clausewitz. I'm going to begin reading up on the tactics of observed leaders and war in order to better understand many social aspects, especially in the area of control.

Thanks,
Charles.




I havent read those books, but I think this might help you as well.

The Old Norse and Teutonic tribes weren't the best scribes, few is know about actual "written" material regarding war and tactics. There are some remains in the ideologies and combat of the renaissance martial arts, especially the sword and buckler.

http://www.thearma.org/manuals.htm

The most accurate manuscript that regarded how our ancestors fought against the Christianity is expansion. Check : "Anonymous Fechtbuch: Manuscript I.33" 13th century German Sword & Buckler Manual

In the area of control, check the boardgame Tablut / Hnefatafl, you will clearly notice and understand how they used the space. It is a fun game too!


Last edited by Askr on Tue Dec 17, 2013 8:18 am, edited 2 times in total.



Wed Dec 08, 2010 10:08 am
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The "Art of War" is a brilliant treatise on strategy and tactics, but it is can really be used for standard living. "All war is based on deception." I believe any of us can recognize the importance of that.
I have read bits of "On War" but not enough to make an enlightened opinion on the work as a whole.
and "The Prince" wasn't meant to be used by tyrants but it is. It is also used to maintain control of a population of an enemy area once it is taken by an invading force. It is better to be feared than loved if you can't be both.


Fri Jul 13, 2012 11:46 pm
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I carry The Art of War in my pocket daily (phone). It's also invaluable in business.


Sat Jul 14, 2012 12:11 am
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tranquilChaos wrote:
I carry The Art of War in my pocket daily (phone). It's also invaluable in business.


I imagine it is. Frankly it is useful for anyone and everyone and it is one of the few books that I think should be read in schools as part of studies, but of course that would make more useful people than most would want.


Sat Jul 14, 2012 12:15 am
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Brothers,

I have read the book called the Art of War many years ago and found it useful, but never applied it to my daily life.


Thu Jul 25, 2013 4:09 am
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I have checked out the book call The Norse Myths by Kevin Crossley-Holland from my local library. So far the material is written well. Is there any other books written by him or books that can be recommend by the Brotherhood?


Mon Apr 18, 2016 6:27 pm
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The Art of War was written by Sun Tzu. Historians are not sure WHICH Sun Tzu from what I understand. It is a book on tactics and strategy. Sun Tzu took a group of women and taught them to be soldiers based on the concepts he wrote.
The Prince by Niccolo Machiavelli was written by the man who had an interesting life. I believe he was some sort of diplomat and wrote that book while he was in seclusion. I believe he had some sort of failure in his life and sat down and thought about what successful rulers have done in the past. He really breaks it down in his book on different types of rulers, armies, and governments and what made them succeed or fail.


Tue Apr 19, 2016 1:01 am
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On War by Karl von clausewitz is a bit more exhaustive than the art of war. It has been too long since I read it
I believe the man was a Prussian general. Could be wrong.


Tue Apr 19, 2016 1:04 am
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sweinodinsson wrote:
On War by Karl von clausewitz is a bit more exhaustive than the art of war. It has been too long since I read it
I believe the man was a Prussian general. Could be wrong.


He was, yes. Clausewitz is often misunderstood due to his dialectical philosophy. For example, he states that war is a wrestling match, and then states that war is the continuation of politics. The two are meant to be seen as thesis and antithesis, showing that war is not simply one thing: it is dynamic with multiple factors all interacting with each other.


Tue Apr 19, 2016 8:53 pm
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