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Odin as our Father 
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Personally I tend to agree with the author you mention.

The image of Odin as a loving and caring God, and even the term "Allfather" reeks of Christian influence.

Everybody has their own UPG though.


Fri May 13, 2016 12:30 am
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Can you provide a single instance of the word "Alföðr" carved in runes that predates the arrival of Christianity in the north?

And the personal habits of an individual have no effect on whether they speak the truth or not.


Fri May 13, 2016 6:38 am
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Eternal Dawn wrote:
Last time, I was searching through books and I came across this claim, the author said that Odin does not like being disturbed by humans unless they have something important to say, or basically that he doesn't care about our issues unless it concerns him. It was written in a very condescending and pessimistic way. I strongly disagreed with the writing. I grew up for most of my childhood without a father, and I found a father figure through our Gods like Thor and Odin, and I recall just speaking in my mind to Odin, telling him how my day went, and I was only little. I basically viewed him like my father, a stern father, but a loving and passionate father. That's the Odin that I knew and grew up with. He is after all, the Allfather.


Do the same, it works


Fri May 13, 2016 3:09 pm
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In Indo-European cultures, "father" is simply a term of respect. The idea lingers on in Catholicism, which calls priests "fathers," even though they are celibates.

When we call Odin "Allfather," it is a term of respect. In traditional Indo-European cultures, "fathers" symbolize authority. Sadly, in our decline, the "daddy" who plays and hugs has replaced the father who commands respect.


Fri May 13, 2016 7:45 pm
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I was left confused when I first read the Prose Eddas and read about "King Odin" and wondered how a man could ever become divine. That is because in my mind I could own fathom this reality. The disappointment of a Catholic upbringing and the widespread atheism always kind of crept into my mind. I kind of thought when they lights go out its game over. Caput. But is it possibe we exist in another reality as well? Maybe Odin was the first to realize that death can be conquered. That the Aesir and Vanir are literally our Elder Kin.


Tue May 24, 2016 1:35 am
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BjornBerserk wrote:
I was left confused when I first read the Prose Eddas and read about "King Odin" and wondered how a man could ever become divine. That is because in my mind I could own fathom this reality. The disappointment of a Catholic upbringing and the widespread atheism always kind of crept into my mind. I kind of thought when they lights go out its game over. Caput. But is it possibe we exist in another reality as well? Maybe Odin was the first to realize that death can be conquered. That the Aesir and Vanir are literally our Elder Kin.


Or perhaps Snorri was euphemising the old gods, and claiming they were not divine but that they were kings who fooled people. The first book of the Edda is called Gylfaginning- the fooling of Gylfi- because Gylfi is "fooled" into following the Æsir.

Or maybe it is possible that gods were once human. Someone on this forum (I cannot remember whom) recently quoted OB in saying 'what is man, except a God who has forgotten what he is?'. Frankly, I am undecided. Perhaps, even, Snorri was a follower of the old ways and wanted to preserve the lore, so did it in the only way he could.

Interestingly, Snorri was killed in 1241, and the brotherhood was founded in 1421... Perhaps the numbers became switched somehow?


Tue May 24, 2016 6:35 am
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By ancestry we are all become wanderers. We hear the legends of myths - how much more can we hope to know except everything?


Sun May 29, 2016 6:59 am
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OdinBrotherhood wrote:
When we call Odin "Allfather," it is a term of respect. In traditional Indo-European cultures, "fathers" symbolize authority. Sadly, in our decline, the "daddy" who plays and hugs has replaced the father who commands respect.


I think we should aim for a balance of both, the trick is to know when to be authoritarian and when to be playful.
Today I heard a quote that we are the generation that respected our parents and fear our children.

I can see Odin as a father figure and as such he would listen to the stories and worries of children, but as we become adults I suspect he expects us to stand more and more on our own, asking counsel only when the way is not clear to us as we would ask counsel of our own fathers.


Wed Jun 15, 2016 12:37 pm
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HI this is hustead8 I have a question haves anybody seen Valhalla or odin in the glimpse ofor extrordinary beauty and if so could some one tell me what it looked like and how many deffrent realms are there


Tue Mar 14, 2017 8:07 pm
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Hustead8 wrote:
HI this is hustead8 I have a question haves anybody seen Valhalla or odin in the glimpse ofor extrordinary beauty and if so could some one tell me what it looked like and how many deffrent realms are there


According to the lore there are 9 Realms:
Alfheim, Asgard, Helheim, Jotunheim, Midgard, Niflheim, Muspelheim, Svartalheim, and Vanaheim.


As for The Glimpse of Extraordinary Beauty, it is generally regarded as an extremely personal experience. What is revealed, and how it is experienced varies from individual to individual.


Tue Mar 14, 2017 9:24 pm
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OdinBrotherhood wrote:
In Indo-European cultures, "father" is simply a term of respect. The idea lingers on in Catholicism, which calls priests "fathers," even though they are celibates.

When we call Odin "Allfather," it is a term of respect. In traditional Indo-European cultures, "fathers" symbolize authority. Sadly, in our decline, the "daddy" who plays and hugs has replaced the father who commands respect.


I agree with the quotation in its entirety. I would like to clarify that while Allfather is a term of respect, it does not necessarily follow that He is the authoritarian figure on the opposite end of the spectrum of the increasingly prevalent diminished father figures of 21st century fiction.

I would like to add a few thoughts about why we would give Him that respect if he is not authoritarian. Thoughts, not statements of fact per sè. When we think of Heimdall as the father of the 3 classes, Odin as the Allfather, Frey as the father of the Swedes, etc., we scholastically expect an epistemology to have been in wide usage. I personally suspect the "father" of authority is more Christian than Native and have been trying to make sense of his role outside of the Christian lens.

Odin, if I might speak of Him without being too casual, seems to be, according to the Lore, a Provider first and foremost. He provides through noble values such as sacrifice (the runes) and strategy (selection of Einherjar for Ragnarok), and yet remains teachable (several examples pertaining to learning magic, notably Seidr), and still loyal (Lokasenna). In the latter two examples, he learns and then disseminates the Seidr, and provides a place for those of us in a liminal state. Furthermore, his chthonic designation gives Him a relevance to both the living and the dead as he provides food, drink, and life that never run out in His Hall. He knows how valuable these things are, especially to us, and as we realize how valuable they are we are more inclined to seek out his acceptance.

As a Father in a more literal sense, I see in Him an example of my responsibility to provide for my children and grandchildren. There is plenty more to say on this topic, but it may be better suited for a different time and place.

r


Wed Mar 15, 2017 4:58 pm
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I understand OP's concern. But all fathers are not cut from the same cloth. The Alfathr is no sugar daddy.


Fri Sep 22, 2017 11:33 am
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OdinBrotherhood wrote:
In Indo-European cultures, "father" is simply a term of respect. The idea lingers on in Catholicism, which calls priests "fathers," even though they are celibates.

When we call Odin "Allfather," it is a term of respect. In traditional Indo-European cultures, "fathers" symbolize authority. Sadly, in our decline, the "daddy" who plays and hugs has replaced the father who commands respect.


Well said. I recall a forgettable movie a few years back. The adult son starts on to his dad about their "relationship" (Junior has been kicked out of college and is running a home casino). His old mnan says, "I'm you're father, not your f*****g girlfriend!" Sadly after that bracing beginning, the film degenerates into the usual Hollywood dreck. (Complete with catharsis climax where the son shouts, "You never said you loved me!" And dad, aw heck. You've seen it a dozen times.)


Fri Sep 22, 2017 11:37 am
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