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Fehu 
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Joined: Thu Jul 28, 2016 6:35 am
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I'd like to go through each rune on is forum in hopes of gaining a better understanding, and perhaps it will benefit others who aren't so knowledgeable on the runes, as well.
So, let us start with fehu.
The meanings I have found that seem to be consistent are pertaining to cattle and moveable wealth.

What other qualities does this rune have? Does anyone know the rune poems for fehu?
I started looking for the poems. Found one book that I saw recommended on this forum, but the epub version is very difficult to read. It seems very chaotic. I'd prefer a much more straightforward copy of the poems, with both the original language and the English translation so I can simply read the poems as they are.


Wed Aug 03, 2016 1:35 pm
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Fe vældur frænda rogi
føðesk ulfr i skogi
Fe er firða gaman
Frænda rogu
gravseiðis gata

Ormen ligg i kveile
i løyndom vakar under
Som ei helufallen åker
Strif dom frender råker

------ ------ ------

Fe causes strife amongst friends
The wolf feeds in the forest
Fe is joy to man
strife among kin
path of the serpent

The snake lies coiled
Hidden, it waits beneath
like a frost-covered field
Strife that kinsmen suffer.


Mon Aug 22, 2016 1:19 pm
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"In ancient times owning cattle was an important way of measuring a mans wealth and standing in the community. This is tangible, measurable prosperity. It can be used in conjunction with other Runes to fully define that which you are working toward. The ancient Norse/Teutonic were peoples who worked for what they got and blessed the gods for it. Magically, look for opportunities to acquire that which you are striving for". Bradley Murphy.

"The prosperity it speaks of is the land and is worked for. This is not a Rune of luck. It is a Rune of reward for hard work". Bradley Murphy.

"Cattle, which is a strong symbol for wealth and prosperity, a source of food, of stability, security and growth."

"Wealth" - source of discord among kinsmen, and fire of the sea and path of the serpent" Icelandic Rune Poems

"... refers to the kind of easy come easy go wealth that cattle represent. A herd of cattle can be acquired quite easily and quickly, by purchase, by theft or even by accident should un-branded cattle wander onto your land. But just as easily they can be lost by accident, rustlers or by hungry wolves. ... It is a kind of wealth that must be nurtured and cared for and not used greedily or carelessly." Graham Butcher

"On a spiritual level this rune is associated with enlightenment through desire. The story of Freyr and Gerda .... There are various possible interpretations ... it deals with the idea of desire as a motivating force of enlightenment, that once we have seen that which we desire most there is no further life unless we have the object of that desire and it cannot be ignored or dismissed without the end of life itself, even though the cost of fulfilling that desire might be the most precious thing we possess." Graham Butcher


Mon Aug 22, 2016 11:18 pm
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Norse Storm wrote:
"In ancient times owning cattle was an important way of measuring a mans wealth and standing in the community. This is tangible, measurable prosperity. It can be used in conjunction with other Runes to fully define that which you are working toward. The ancient Norse/Teutonic were peoples who worked for what they got and blessed the gods for it. Magically, look for opportunities to acquire that which you are striving for". Bradley Murphy.

"The prosperity it speaks of is the land and is worked for. This is not a Rune of luck. It is a Rune of reward for hard work". Bradley Murphy.

"Cattle, which is a strong symbol for wealth and prosperity, a source of food, of stability, security and growth."

"Wealth" - source of discord among kinsmen, and fire of the sea and path of the serpent" Icelandic Rune Poems

"... refers to the kind of easy come easy go wealth that cattle represent. A herd of cattle can be acquired quite easily and quickly, by purchase, by theft or even by accident should un-branded cattle wander onto your land. But just as easily they can be lost by accident, rustlers or by hungry wolves. ... It is a kind of wealth that must be nurtured and cared for and not used greedily or carelessly." Graham Butcher

"On a spiritual level this rune is associated with enlightenment through desire. The story of Freyr and Gerda .... There are various possible interpretations ... it deals with the idea of desire as a motivating force of enlightenment, that once we have seen that which we desire most there is no further life unless we have the object of that desire and it cannot be ignored or dismissed without the end of life itself, even though the cost of fulfilling that desire might be the most precious thing we possess." Graham Butcher
\
I feel a strong pull by the Fehu rune. I am not very experienced in the runes. I have only read a handful of books about them and about the same amount of experience working with them. Of course, I am in business and raise animals, so that makes sense. I wish I knew more about how the Runes work and work together.

Storm: I see you quoting Graham Butcher. That is cool. In the past year I discovered his work and get newsletters from him. He has interesting ways of looking at things.


Tue Aug 23, 2016 11:37 am
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Baleyg wrote:
Fe vældur frænda rogi
føðesk ulfr i skogi
Fe er firða gaman
Frænda rogu
gravseiðis gata

Ormen ligg i kveile
i løyndom vakar under
Som ei helufallen åker
Strif dom frender råker

------ ------ ------

Fe causes strife amongst friends
The wolf feeds in the forest
Fe is joy to man
strife among kin
path of the serpent

The snake lies coiled
Hidden, it waits beneath
like a frost-covered field
Strife that kinsmen suffer.


Excellent baleyg! Just what I was look in for! Now to try to make sense of it! Lol!


Thu Aug 25, 2016 3:59 pm
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Norse Storm wrote:
"In ancient times owning cattle was an important way of measuring a mans wealth and standing in the community. This is tangible, measurable prosperity. It can be used in conjunction with other Runes to fully define that which you are working toward. The ancient Norse/Teutonic were peoples who worked for what they got and blessed the gods for it. Magically, look for opportunities to acquire that which you are striving for". Bradley Murphy.

"The prosperity it speaks of is the land and is worked for. This is not a Rune of luck. It is a Rune of reward for hard work". Bradley Murphy.

"Cattle, which is a strong symbol for wealth and prosperity, a source of food, of stability, security and growth."

"Wealth" - source of discord among kinsmen, and fire of the sea and path of the serpent" Icelandic Rune Poems

"... refers to the kind of easy come easy go wealth that cattle represent. A herd of cattle can be acquired quite easily and quickly, by purchase, by theft or even by accident should un-branded cattle wander onto your land. But just as easily they can be lost by accident, rustlers or by hungry wolves. ... It is a kind of wealth that must be nurtured and cared for and not used greedily or carelessly." Graham Butcher

"On a spiritual level this rune is associated with enlightenment through desire. The story of Freyr and Gerda .... There are various possible interpretations ... it deals with the idea of desire as a motivating force of enlightenment, that once we have seen that which we desire most there is no further life unless we have the object of that desire and it cannot be ignored or dismissed without the end of life itself, even though the cost of fulfilling that desire might be the most precious thing we possess." Graham Butcher


Thank you. I understand the more mundane aspects of this rune, but your quotes are quite helpful, especially in gaining a better understanding of the rune poem.


Thu Aug 25, 2016 4:04 pm
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sweinodinsson wrote:
I feel a strong pull by the Fehu rune. I am not very experienced in the runes. I have only read a handful of books about them and about the same amount of experience working with them. Of course, I am in business and raise animals, so that makes sense. I wish I knew more about how the Runes work and work together.

Storm: I see you quoting Graham Butcher. That is cool. In the past year I discovered his work and get newsletters from him. He has interesting ways of looking at things.


Sweinodinsson, I grew up farming and raising cattle, primarily to supply our family with beef, so the concept of cattle as a symbol of wealth does not elude me. I see it as very valuable to be able to grow or hunt ones own food. I have always liked this rune as well.


Thu Aug 25, 2016 4:13 pm
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I also grew up on a farm, in my case it was a dairy.
Always found that cattle were more easy go than easy come, as they do require a lot of work to obtain and maintain, even if you were to steal them (I heard that this is part of my ancestry also) it requires effort.


Fri Aug 26, 2016 10:50 pm
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Hroda Alwynsson wrote:
I also grew up on a farm, in my case it was a dairy.
Always found that cattle were more easy go than easy come, as they do require a lot of work to obtain and maintain, even if you were to steal them (I heard that this is part of my ancestry also) it requires effort.

I didn't experience such difficulty with cattle. We only slaughtered about 1 per year, sold any surplus cattle at market, keeping only the ones we needed to maintain our herd, and only kept 1 mature bull at a time. We lost the occasional cow to lightning or other causes, such as during calving, but other than that they were more easy come than easy go for us.
Money is another matter for me, though! Haha! Takes so much effort to acquire only to be spent so much faster than you can earn it, even when you try to be thrifty as I do.


Sat Aug 27, 2016 8:53 am
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Even when we were careful we would lose a few during calving though we checked them 3 to 4 times a day, one or 2 to bloat in spring (inflamation of the rumen leading to suffocation of the animal, for those who don't know) that is with using lick blocks, we would even cut the clover and let is wilt before the cows ate it to eliminate the risk and maybe even one to snake bite.
From the time that I can remember we started out with 60 milkers, but due to decreasing gains and increasing costs we had to buy the farm next door and increase the milkers to 200 about 20 years ago, now herds are up around 500.
I find it annoying and disappointing how farming is now being run by buiness and more and more family farms disappearing, there is no way now for a young man to get into comercial farming starting from nothing, you are talking about an investment of millions of dollars.
Maybe thats why I have a problem with the "easy come" concept when it comes to cattle.
Easy come for me is the result of luck such as a windfall in gambling or from loto.


Sat Aug 27, 2016 12:08 pm
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Hroda Alwynsson wrote:
Even when we were careful we would lose a few during calving though we checked them 3 to 4 times a day, one or 2 to bloat in spring (inflamation of the rumen leading to suffocation of the animal, for those who don't know) that is with using lick blocks, we would even cut the clover and let is wilt before the cows ate it to eliminate the risk and maybe even one to snake bite.
From the time that I can remember we started out with 60 milkers, but due to decreasing gains and increasing costs we had to buy the farm next door and increase the milkers to 200 about 20 years ago, now herds are up around 500.
I find it annoying and disappointing how farming is now being run by buiness and more and more family farms disappearing, there is no way now for a young man to get into comercial farming starting from nothing, you are talking about an investment of millions of dollars.
Maybe thats why I have a problem with the "easy come" concept when it comes to cattle.
Easy come for me is the result of luck such as a windfall in gambling or from loto.


I hear you. Farming is damn hard to get into. It's always what I wanted to do in life, but without the big money you speak of, there's no way to make it happen. I'd be content now just to be able to homestead, but at first requires an adequate income so we can afford to rent or buy a house with a reasonable bit of land. We rent an apartment in a village in Germany. It is a 3 family home, but no garden even comes with our flat, although we are in a farming community.

My dad's farm is small scale. His main money comes from greenhouses, which he started up on his own roughly 30 years ago. I doubt he'd be able to make a start up like that from nothing these days and have the same success. I've watched many of the other greenhouse businesses in the area dry up over the years, when it used to be a thriving industry for the area when I was a child. Cattle was more on line with homesteading for us. I'm not sure what the most we ever had is, maybe a hundred head or so, but then we scaled back to our original capacity, and kept maybe 20 or 30, give or take. We didn't have many health problems, due to the pasture conditions we has. Not much other than grass and sparse trees. Due to the Florida heat, it kept pretty dry, so our cows and horses never had the problem of too much lush pasture. Never had issues with foundering horses. Occasionally lost a calf during calving and a few times lost a cow in the process, but otherwise, we were very fortunate compared to other cattle farmers I've spoken to.
We had more trouble during the time we kept pigs. Degenerates from the area, people we knew, were always breaking in and stealing, and saw the pigs as easy targets. After that went on for so long, we finally quit raising them. The last pig we had was a wild pig who was rescued after she lost her mother to a panther or bobcat, forget which. She was adorable. An we set her free in my dad's 180 acres of forest.


Sun Aug 28, 2016 10:42 am
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To be a boss in agriculture requires creativity. There are many times that you do not have the right tool for the job, so you have to make one or modify another tool or in some other way, think outside the box.
Agriculture, for the self employed is similar to any other business. To compete, you must have your own niche.
You also must sacrifice your life to your work.

So you have no money and you have no land....once you do have money and land, you will find many other things that you THINK you MUST have...things you can not do without. Welcome to agriculture and welcome to business.
You have to make the most of what you have. I won't school anybody on here, because I believe that a man has exactly what he wants in life....because if he wanted something else then he would go and get it.
I will give 2 pieces of advice to those on here who want to get into agriculture or business in general.

1.) You must learn the ancient Jedi art of, "turning chicken shite into chicken salad."
2.) You don't have to own any land or even have a lease agreement on paper to begin your life as an agricultural entrepreneur....all you need is your mind and your hands.


Mon Aug 29, 2016 5:53 pm
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sweinodinsson wrote:
1.) You must learn the ancient Jedi art of, "turning chicken shite into chicken salad."


sorry to selectively quote, but mate I love this, never a truer word spoken.
farmers are masters of wasting little to nothing.
Thanks to my upbringing I converted a pile of scrap steel into a carry for my dad's tractor, he ended up using it to push 300 plus kilogram rocks out of the fields and pick them up. Not what I had in mind when I built it but after a few year of spending the weekends welding up things he had broken during the week I might have slipped in a bit of over engineering just to be safe.

But besides the creativity you also have to have patience.
Good neighbours are a huge bonus as well


Mon Aug 29, 2016 6:27 pm
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Over the years, my goals have altered slightly. What we really want is to homestead. We were getting there in Idaho, renting a house on a ranch that had a big enough yard for gardening, a chicken coop was already there, so with a little work to it up, it was good to go by the time the spring chicks were coming in. We build raised garden beds based on designs that I came up with, and had a great season. Then we left it all behind to return to Germany. Sometimes, things take time. I don't want to be where I'm at right now, in a kinda state of limbo, living in an apartment with no garden space, but it is what we have to do until we can increase our income enough to afford a home that meets our needs. Say what you want, but you can't raise chickens and goats in an apartment with no access to land. Just doesn't work like that. I'm gardening at my in laws house, but I don't know if they will let me do that again next year. They have the space, but are too closed minded about what we are trying to do. They want their perfect lawn and perfect flower beds, but they don't want a vegetable garden that they don't see as ornamental and pretty. I think gardens are beautiful, but then I have different priorities and always have.
So, we wait, and keep our eyes open for the right thing to come along. It took two years of waiting to find that ranch house in Idaho, when before there was nothing that was in our budget or specifications.


Tue Aug 30, 2016 10:30 am
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If you have a balcony you can get something going, instead of going horizontal go vertical, things like strawberries and some kinds of lettuce would work, herbs of course.

You could make a ladder out of 6" pvc pipe, where the rungs are half pipes (or 2/3) that you plant in.


Wed Aug 31, 2016 1:28 am
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Hroda Alwynsson wrote:
If you have a balcony you can get something going, instead of going horizontal go vertical, things like strawberries and some kinds of lettuce would work, herbs of course.

You could make a ladder out of 6" pvc pipe, where the rungs are half pipes (or 2/3) that you plant in.

I don't have a balcony, but I'm hoping my landlords won't object to me putting some planters out in front of our ground floor apartment. There should be enough space to grow a few things, like tomatoes, peppers, and other crops that don't require much space. Also, window planters for lettuces, herbs and such. Hopefully, we'll be able to find a house after a year or so longer, once my husband has had time to get established at his job and things are falling into place. That's always the hard part about starting over somewhere new, but we have done it so many times, that it's become pretty familiar to us! Haha!


Wed Aug 31, 2016 8:48 am
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We don't go on vacations. We just move to wherever we want to visit, live there 2 or 3 years and move on to the next destination! Lmao! ;-) it really isn't always intentional, we just get tired of a place, usually because it doesn't meet our needs, such as ending up in the city but wanting to be in a rural area.


Wed Aug 31, 2016 8:50 am
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I've been thinking of Fehu in regard to my tribe.

As the first rune, Fehu signifies the beginning for me. As beings, we come into the world needing food, water, shelter, our daily. As we grow into childhood, we want ever more. A toy, my toy, your toy. We want this and that. We consume without ever a thought of giving of ourselves, working to help or replenishing what we have consumed.

If we stay in this initial position, we are a drain on our families, communities and world. The challenge of addressing this initial position is to find a balance between over consumption and over production. Between carelessness and greed.

As I stated above, pure consumption drains our tribes. Weakens us. On the other hand, overproduction can weaken our tribes. It could foster too much dependence on the producers, the gift givers. Gifts regularly given are often under appreciated and eventually expected or even demanded.

As I relate this idea to the lore, I must acknowledge the truth that the circulation of wealth within our gates must be handled differently from without our gates.

It's much easier to identify the dangerous, compromising forces within our ranks than it is without.


Sun Nov 20, 2016 4:03 pm
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